Girl From Mars

Do you remember the time when you were girl from mars
I don’t know if you knew that
Oh we stayed up late playing cards
Henri Winterman cigars
And she told never told me her name
I still love you the girl from mars

Sitting in a dreamy daze by the waters edge
On a cool summer night
Fireflies and stars in the sky
Gentle glowing light
From your cigarette
The breeze blowing softly on my face
Reminds me of something else
Something that in my memory has been replaced
Suddenly it all comes back
And as I look to the stars

I remember the time when you were girl from mars
I don’t know if you knew that
Oh we stayed up late playing cards
Henri Winterman cigars
And she told never told me her name
I still love you the girl from mars

Surging through the darkness
Over the moonlit stand
Electricity in the air
Twisting all through the night on the terrace
Now that summers here
I know that you were almost in love with me
I could see it in your eyes
Strange lights shimmering over the sea tonight
And it almost blows my mind
And as I look to the stars

I remember the time when you were girl from mars
I don’t know if you knew that
Oh we stayed up late playing cards
Henri Winterman cigars
And she told never told me her name
I still love you the girl from mars

Today a sleep in the chair by the window
It felt as if you’d returned
I though that you were standing over me
When I woke there was no one there
I still love girl from mars

Do you remember the time when you were girl from mars
I don’t know if you knew that
Oh we stayed up late playing cards
Henri Winterman cigars
And she told never told me her name
Do you remember the time when you were girl from mars
I don’t know if you knew that
Oh we stayed up late playing cards
Henri Winterman cigars
And I’ll still dream of you
I still love you the girl from mars

Song Notes

Ash’s breakthrough single that peaked at number 11 in the UK singles charts. A classic Wheeler love song, there was a long-standing rumour that the song was originally entitled “Girl From Ards”, a place in Northern Ireland and written about a girl Tim went out with from there. However in a May, 2018 interview with the Times Tim Wheeler denied the claim. The song is always in Ash’s live set list, the band used to kick off their gigs with it in during the Nu-Clear Sounds tour but it has since moved down.

Tim speaking to Team Rock about the track in 2016:

Our first hit, which recently celebrated its 20th anniversary last month. I actually wrote this one when I was 16, two years before it came out. Our manager and record label didn’t want us to record it for Trailer because they thought it had hit potential and they didn’t want to waste that while we were still at school and wouldn’t be able to properly promote it. So once all the exams were done we put it out and it changed our lives for good.

The girls in Northern Ireland weren’t happening for me, but you can really romanticise someone from outer space, put them on a pedestal. I was into shit like Star Wars and Battlestar Galactica, and as a kid I’d dream that my parents were Princess Leia and Luke Skywalker. That’s why I loved David Bowie and the Pixies’ Trompe Le Monde album, because they had all these sci-fi references. Maybe it’s to do with growing up in such an isolated place. Downpatrick is 20 miles from Belfast and a bit of a rough town. The troubles were still going on in 1993 and it was still an edgy kind of place.

In my mind, the girl definitely wasn’t green, she looked normal. The people in Star Wars were just glamorous humans. To me it was more of a metaphor. The main thing behind it – and where the sense of yearning in the song comes from – was that I’d broken up with my first girlfriend. I’d fallen hard-core in love, it had fizzled out that summer, and I was still mourning that. At 16 I started getting depressed. I was a lovesick teenager.

I had made friends with some English kids and we’d smoke cigars and drink beer all night on the beach. I wasn’t trying to capture that spirit of coming of age, but it’s just in there because that’s exactly what was happening to me.

Some of the melodies were a bit Teenage Fanclub-ish. We were very much doing the pop-punk thing, but the solo was a remnant of my early days of being in really bad metal bands. The first rock band I got into was Thin Lizzy, and I’d been trying to copy Brian Robertson since I was 10, so I played this fast wah-wah lead. We’d write pop tunes, but we’d always try to get metal solos in there.